Newborn guinea pigs

Cute baby Guinea PigsBaby guinea pigs are so cute, but with that comes the all important care involved through their early years. Once born they are fully developed with complete eyesight and hearing and are able to start standing and walking straight away. Guinea pigs are extraordinary in the fact that their whole bodies are completely developed from birth, unlike when some other animals are born.

General Care

Over 3 to 6 weeks after birth, the mother obviously has a big role to play in terms of feeding them their milk. It is only after this period that solid food can be introduced to them, like nuggets and alfafa hay. The babies should not be separated from the mother before they reach 3 weeks old. After this, they can be separated, if being sold.

If the babies are not getting the adequate amount of milk from the mother, their weight is going to be down. It is important to than help them, by placing up to the mother for milk. In more drastic instances, you need to syringe feed the milk into the babies mouths.

Its great to watch them bouncing and jumping around, but make sure to have them placed with their mother in a decent sized cage, with no areas that could cause any accidents and food with water accessible because of how small they are. Guinea pigs also in general don’t want to hear loud noises, so be especially quiet around baby piggies.

From a young age, socialise as much as you can and pick them up or stroke them too, so they get used to being handled and having human company. When being around adult piggies, this develops the pups social development.

They continue to grow bigger up until a year old, when they will reach their full adult size. Its not unusual for them to increase in weight up to 18 months of age. They will only weigh around 100 grams when born and than gradually increase, it is important to weigh every week to see any changes in weight.

Feeding

As mentioned after 3 weeks old solid food should be introduced, so feed them a couple of handfuls of nuggets every day. Feed a good amount of alfafa hay every day as it is high in calcium, when they are adults it will be a very rare occasion in feeding that hay. Veggies that are high in vitamin c like peppers and calcium like kale and spinach. You may find when they get older, certain veggies that they liked when they were younger, they may not be quite so keen on when older.

Play time!

Being babies, they will have bundles of energy and will get up to mischief. Babies will be more interested in playing with toys than adults will be. Provide balls, tunnels but not high levels as they are still not good with heights and big falls.

Put them out on the grass after they are a couple of months old, so they will be better in eating the grass. When older age hits they will sleep more and not be as interested in playing about.

Buying baby guinea pigs

Its very important you choose a reliable and trustworthy pet shop, rescue centre or breeder. Not lethargic, bright-eyed, no nasal discharge and shiny coat. The last thing you want to do is pick an ill baby and than your other guinea pigs could catch something from the new addition/s.

Thank you for reading my article, please feel free to leave a comment below and I will reply back as soon as possible. Perhaps you currently have baby guinea pigs, I would love to hear from you.

Sources:

https://www.critterbabies.com/animals/guinea-pigs/

http://www.sleevely.com/baby-guinea-pigs/

https://petponder.com/baby-guinea-pig-care

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6 comments found

  1. Woow

    That’s a website only for feeding guinea pigs…Wow! That’s a pretty narrow niche, I guess. But I see you are doing a good job of maintaining it. I haven’t seen a newborn guinea pig ever but they look cute. Thanks for sharing this info on feeding them, I’ll make sure to direct someone to your website in case anyone needs a guinea pig.

  2. My friend had Guinea Pigs all through high school. I find that they are the perfect low-maintenance pet. Not very affectionate though… for my liking lol. They also don’t live very long compared to other pets. Quite simple creatures, they are. Cute as heck though! 

    I think they may be a good compromise between getting a super low maintenance pet like a gold-fish and something that is requires more commitment like a dog. Thanks for the info! 

    1. They are very cute and the great thing is each one has their unique personality. Guinea Pigs are not as low maintenance as people think, they do require quite a lot of care in terms of cleaning their homes out, but you do it for the love. You do need the time and money to look after them. 

      They can live quite a long time, so more of a commitment. Out of all the small animals, they can live one of the longest. On average 5 to 8 years, can live longer than this. Each pet has their disadvantages and advantages, but at least with Guinea Pigs, you have more control at where they are going. 

      Thank you for stopping by.

      Best Wishes,

      Eden 🙂

  3. Thanks for this useful article on newborn guinea pigs. My granddaughters each have a batch of newborns that they are raising, and this will help them make sure that they all are taken care of properly. This is a phase that all kids go through (pets) and they love the additions to the family.

    I have noted the advice and will pass this on, plus I will provide the link so my daughters can have them stop by and read for themselves how to care for the baby piggies. They will also likely look around your website too, and pick up more nuggets that they can use. 

    Is it advisable to wait until they are older before selling them? What might be the ideal age to start selling them? The kids right now have no intention of ever selling them, but it is that or finding new homes for them according to my daughters. They are not interested in having too many of the lively pets in the home long-term.

    1. Hello Dave,

      That is great, I have covered a big range of topics on caring for Guinea Pigs.

      You can start selling them whilst they are still very young after a month old. To give the babies time with the mother. 

      Best Wishes 

      Eden 🙂

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